Archive for category cloud

Paul meets Bill Gates

From a heads up on a post by Jake, Paul Watson has been meeting with Microsoft and Bill Gates this week discussing cloud computing for science. Reported in a local North east media site as Microsoft leaders in thrall to Northern expertise, the report outlines cloud computing technology at Newcastle highlighting Paul’s company Inkspot science.

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CARMEN – A Scalable Science cloud

Paul Watson presents a talk on CARMEN a the Google Seattle Conference on Scalability.

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Minimum Information about a Neuroscience Investigation (MINI)

The idea behind the CARMEN project is that we provide a system to store electrophysiology data and analysis services so that data can be shared and analysed in the “Neuro-cloud”. An important factor in realising this system is that the stored data and the services have to be described in a way that is both human and computationally amenable. The first stage of this is agreeing what information should actually be ascribed to the data. In other words, the balance between what the experimentalist want to say about their data and what informaticians need to know about a particular data set in order to perform their analysis. To this end we have defined what we believe to be the minimum information that must be ascribed to an electrophysiology experiment for submission to the CARMEN system. It follows the now well practised format of MIAME and MIAPE minimum reporting requirements. In the first instance the document only represents consensus within the CARMEN consortium. However, it could form the basis of a community reporting standard for electrophysiology experiments. The document is available on Nature preceedings at the following URL and comments and opinions are encouraged.  http://precedings.nature.com/documents/1720/version/1

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RSS readers

I have outlined my growing tendency at the minute to handing over applications to the “Internet cloud” in an earlier post.

I prefer using web-based applications because I tend to jump from several machines throughout the day at work and then use a different machine at home. Having applications, floating in the ether cloud, means moving around is considerably easier. I have been using bloglines for quite a while now for my RSS feeds. I did have a early look at Google reader when it first launched, but I felt then it was not quite what I wanted and definitely not as good as bloglines at the time. However a re-visiting of Google reader over the last week or so has dramatically changed my perception. Re-vamped with a new interface (similar to bloglines) has made reading posts alot easier. All the post from your subscribed feeds are actually saved, by default and don’t disappear once read, unlike in bloglines (unless you check the “keep new” box). I think the biggest feature for me is the ability to tag posts, combined with the saved posts facility, this should prove to be a very handy source of reference rather that just an “recent-post viewer”.

A new feature that has just been added to Google reader is the offline mode. Working in conjunction with Google Gears this provides the ability to read the last 2000 recent items, a feature I am looking forward to testing during the flight to ISMB in a few weeks.

If you use another RSS reader or have an opinion on Google reader then let me know.

With using gmail, and calendar, with trying out Google reader (and probably switching from bloglines), using google docs and spreadsheets more everyday, there is every danger that my cloud is going to be raining google. With the added prospect of Google presentations round the corner will it be long before I am floating off to the Google OS cloud?

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