Archive for July, 2007

RSS readers

I have outlined my growing tendency at the minute to handing over applications to the “Internet cloud” in an earlier post.

I prefer using web-based applications because I tend to jump from several machines throughout the day at work and then use a different machine at home. Having applications, floating in the ether cloud, means moving around is considerably easier. I have been using bloglines for quite a while now for my RSS feeds. I did have a early look at Google reader when it first launched, but I felt then it was not quite what I wanted and definitely not as good as bloglines at the time. However a re-visiting of Google reader over the last week or so has dramatically changed my perception. Re-vamped with a new interface (similar to bloglines) has made reading posts alot easier. All the post from your subscribed feeds are actually saved, by default and don’t disappear once read, unlike in bloglines (unless you check the “keep new” box). I think the biggest feature for me is the ability to tag posts, combined with the saved posts facility, this should prove to be a very handy source of reference rather that just an “recent-post viewer”.

A new feature that has just been added to Google reader is the offline mode. Working in conjunction with Google Gears this provides the ability to read the last 2000 recent items, a feature I am looking forward to testing during the flight to ISMB in a few weeks.

If you use another RSS reader or have an opinion on Google reader then let me know.

With using gmail, and calendar, with trying out Google reader (and probably switching from bloglines), using google docs and spreadsheets more everyday, there is every danger that my cloud is going to be raining google. With the added prospect of Google presentations round the corner will it be long before I am floating off to the Google OS cloud?

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More on Open science

Thanks to everybody that commented on my post Do scientists really believe in open science? and to Open access news and Nautilus for picking up on it. It has definately stimulated some discussions

James keep us posted on the outcomes of the theft of your colleagues work.

This is just a note to say that Michael Barton of Bioinformatics Zen has started an open science wiki page at Nodalpoint, I think, for a special edition of Bio::blogs so feel free to comment.

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